This is not an uncomplicated situation. (Much like the previous sentence, which could have simply read “This is a complicated situation.”) There are refugees fleeing the violence of the Islamic State. There is a chance that among those refugees—as is true among the general population—there are those who wish to do harm to the enemies of the Islamic State. It seems as though all sides of this debate are in agreement that this is the case.

There are hopefully more than two options with two opposite outcomes to choose from here, but let’s say there aren’t. Let’s say that if we accept refugees from Syria, we will die at their hands, much sooner than we had previously expected to die. And let’s say that if we don’t accept refugees from Syria, we don’t die in a terrorist attack, and we live as long as we currently imagine we will live.

(For the record, these are both baseless assumptions, but they do present us with a tangible scenario to think through. Any of us could die on our way home from work this afternoon, and any of us could survive a nuclear terrorist attack.)

Even if our two choices are (1) deny refugees and live a long life or (2) accept refugees and die in a terrorist attack sooner than we think we should, does that change our answer?

Say we choose option one. We refuse refugees, and are therefore not killed in a terrorist attack. We live longer, but our lives are less human. We feel safer, but we love less. We die of natural causes at the end of a long life marked by something other than love for our neighbor, the stranger, and our enemy.

Say we choose option two. We accept the refugee and we are killed. What happens then? We face Jesus. And he says something like “I was a stranger and you welcomed me.” And we say something like “When where you a stranger, and when did we welcome you?” And he says something like “As you did unto one of the least of these, you did unto to me.”

I don’t really know what I think about all of this. Were I the one in charge of making the decision, I wish I could say that I am 100% certain of what I would do. But I do know what I want to think, and what by God’s grace I have decided to think, and how I have decided to pray.

Sovereign God, may we who are the Body of Christ, the Church, embrace and welcome the immigrant, the refugee, and all who seek shelter from any danger.

We lift our prayer to You,

People: Lord, hear us.

God of protection, whose Son fled violence from his own home with Joseph and Mary and sought refuge in a foreign land, hear the cries of all who suffer because of hatred, war, violence, greed, and famine. Help us to peacefully mend our divisions, that all you have created in this world may be whole.

We lift our prayer to You,

People: Lord, hear us.

God Who makes us One, we pray for our nation and all the nations of the world, that those who govern the people and have authority over them may consider each life to be of value and may serve the people of their nation with equity and fairness, dedicating themselves to peaceful resolution of conflict.

We lift our prayer to You,

People: Lord, hear us.

Gracious God, we pray for our newest neighbors, that those families who have sought refuge from the ravages of war and violence may find not only shelter and sustenance, but also a loving and supportive community in which to create a new beginning with dignity.

We lift our prayer to You,

People: Lord, hear us.

Loving God, there is no one that goes unnoticed in Your eyes. Take into Yourself all who suffer. May Christ the Wounded Healer relieve the pain of hunger of the refugee, heal the afflicted body, soothe the fears of the mind, bring peace to the soul, and be tender with the broken hearted, that those who have endured unspeakable trials may find themselves restored in Christ.

We lift our prayer to You,

People: Lord, hear us.

Eternal God, may you receive those who have died during times of war and violence into your loving and peaceful arms and may they find rest for their souls. Comfort those who mourn the loss of their friends and loved ones and give them relief from the painful memories they bear, giving assurance of eternal life.

We lift our prayer to You,

People: Lord, hear us.

Almighty and Loving God, you who have crossed the boundaries of Heaven and Earth to be with your people, visit those who must flee their homes because of violence and oppression and lead them to a land of safety.

We give thanks to you, Source of All Being, that you hear our intercessions on behalf of our refugee brothers and sisters. We thank you that love swallows fear, that in your compassion we learn to walk with those who suffer, that when we give of ourselves we receive far more, and that when we receive those who stand knocking at our doors, we receive Christ the Beloved One.

May all praise, glory and honor be to our God, the Most High.

Amen.

If you are looking for a place to give, consider our dear friends at For the Nations Refugee Outreach.